Conferences and Outreach

Cultural Heritage in the Modern Digital World

Galilean Giovilabio, an instrument to measure the periods and eclipses of Jupiter's satellites
Word cloud generated in Voyant Tools. From “Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works” by Caterina Agostini, a blog post for Northeastern University Women Writers Project (22 June 2020)

Call for Papers | Visualizing Hidden Meanings: Harriot and Galilei 

Call for Papers 

The workshop, “Visualizing Hidden Meanings: Symbolism and Cryptography in the Writings of Thomas Harriot and Galileo Galilei,” explores the intersection of science, symbolism, and cryptography in the books and manuscripts of two early modern scholars, Thomas Harriot and Galileo Galilei. Recent work in the Harriot Papers at Notre Dame (https://osf.io/r78gx/) has led to a first edition of the De infinitis (On the Infinite) while also fostering research on the history of mathematics in the early modern period. In addition to Harriot’s studies in algebra and combinatorial studies and Galileo’s contributions to astronomy and physics, both of these scholars had a hidden dimension to their work, one that involved the use of symbolism and cryptography to protect authorship and to claim the priority of their discoveries. This workshop aims to bring together new perspectives on symbolism and cryptography in the early modern period, in particular, to discuss the hidden, enigmatic elements present in the writings, notebooks, and correspondences of Galileo and Harriot. 

The workshop will be held in person at the University of Notre Dame’s Navari Family Center for Digital Scholarship, Reilly Center for Science, Technology and Values, and Rare Books and Special Collections, and online, via Zoom.


Please consider submitting an abstract on one of these topics:


Participants are also invited to attend an interactive session, “Coding and Decoding.” 

In a dedicated practical activity in the humanities and digital humanities, participants will have the opportunity to decode some of the cryptic elements in the works of Galileo and Harriot and study other coding systems. Starting with the ciphers devised by Johannes Trithemius, Leon Battista Alberti, and Giambattista Della Porta, participants will find out more about the use of cryptography and coding in scientific and diplomatic contexts – for example in the Venetian Republic and the Medici family correspondence in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, as well as more recent coding and decoding initiatives developed around the use of punch cards and the indexing technique by Father Roberto Busa, S.J., and IBM for a concordance of works by Saint Thomas Aquinas called the Index Thomisticus project.


Concurrently with the Visualizing Hidden Meanings workshop, Rare Books and Special Collections will host a special exhibition, Making Books Count: Early Modern Books in the History of Mathematics at Notre Dame, a showcase of books relevant to the study of Harriot and Galilei.


Please send a title, an abstract of 150-200 words, and a short bio to Caterina Agostini at caterina.agostini@nd.edu by April 15, 2024. 


Workshop Organizers

Dr. Caterina Agostini, University of Notre Dame (caterina.agostini@nd.edu)

Professor Robert Goulding, University of Notre Dame (rgouldin@nd.edu)

Dr. Daniel Johnson, University of Notre Dame (djohns27@nd.edu

Digital Galileo

On the left, top: a Galilean giovilabio, an instrument to measure periods and eclipses of Jupiter's satellites. 

Source: Smithsonian Institution


On the left, bottom: the frontispiece to Galileo's Sidereus Nuncius (The Starry Messenger, Venice: Tommaso Baglioni, 1610). Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons


On the right: a word cloud visualization generated in Voyant Tools, from Caterina Agostini's blog post “Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works”, Northeastern University Women Writers Project (22 June 2020)

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 

I intend to contribute to a culture of inclusion and equity through current programs available at my workplace, a land acknowledgment, and new programs promoting equity and diversity that I could help initiate, based on models I saw in the Diversity Peer Educators at Rutgers. My research, teaching, and service experience has helped me achieve one of my personal goals as an academic, which is to create a safe space in a culturally diverse campus where ethnic, cultural, religious, and gender differences are respected regardless of personal demographic characteristics.

Open Access Scholarship

Open Access: My Assets in SOAR (Scholarly Open Access at Rutgers) 

The Scholarly Open Access at Rutgers (SOAR, https://soar.libraries.rutgers.edu) is a repository to collect, share, and circulate scholarship developed and published by the Rutgers community, through Rutgers Libraries digital collections and a shareable Digital Object Identifier (DOI). The goal is to champion open access scholarship, ranging from books, articles, and websites, to conference presentations and posters.


Open-Access Articles

“Art in the Time of Syphilis: A Digital Humanities Approach toward Considering a Medical Narrative in Benvenuto Cellini’s Autobiography.” Interdisciplinary Digital Engagement in Arts & Humanities (IDEAH), Volume 2, Issue 1 (2021), https://doi.org/10.21428/f1f23564.97921c12


Published online on 14 September 2021. Interdisciplinary Digital Engagement in Arts & Humanities (IDEAH) is a peer-reviewed, online, open access journal committed to publishing digital humanities research. IDEAH is a Canadian Social Knowledge Institute (C-SKI; c-ski.ca) journal.


Review of Dario Rodighiero, Mapping Affinities: Democratizing Data Visualization. Geneve, Switzerland:  MetisPresses, 2021, Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (2021), free access, https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqab096 (8 November 2021). Free-access link in the Rutgers SOAR institutional repository


Published online on 8 November 2021. Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (DSH) is an international, peer reviewed journal which publishes original contributions on all aspects of digital scholarship in the Humanities. DSH is published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Digital Humanities (EADH), formerly known as the Association for Literary and Linguistic Computing, a digital humanities organization founded in London in 1973. The journal Digital Scholarship in the Humanities was previously known as Literary and Linguistic Computing.


Book Chapter, peer-reviewed 

“Communicating across Cultures: The Case of Primo Levi, Italo Calvino, and Pliny the Elder.” In Translation, Globalization and Translocation: The Classroom and Beyond. Ed. Concepción Godev. New York-Cham: Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, 2018: 63-77. Book Chapter, peer-reviewed

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-61818-0_4 


Translation, Globalization and Translocation: The Classroom and Beyond, in the Palgrave Studies in Translating and Interpreting series

Book DOI: https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-3-319-61818-0   


Blog Posts


“The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments at Harvard.” Invited guest blog post for Mainly Museums (3 August 2021) 

URL: https://mainlymuseums.com/post/892/the-collection-of-historical-scientific-instruments-at-harvard 

By 18 August 2021, the article had over 6,400 views (Source: Twitter analytics)

"Revealing Data: Ars de statica medicina, 1614." An invited blog post for the "Revealing data" series in the National Library of Medicine blog "Circulating Now" (5 November 2020)

URL: https://circulatingnow.nlm.nih.gov/2020/11/05/revealing-data-ars-de-statica-medicina-1614 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031628448904646

"Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works." This post is part of a series published by Northeastern University with projects from the 2019 Advanced Institute on Text Analysis, on Word Vectors, with support from the Women Writers Project and the National Endowment for the Humanities in July 2019 (22 June 2020)

URL: https://wwp.northeastern.edu/blog/textual-analysis-galileos-works 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031628448804646 

"Digital Humanities Tools in Online Humanities Classes." A blog post on digital pedagogical tools, for the Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative (5 June 2020)

URL: https://dh.rutgers.edu/digital-humanities-tools-in-online-humanities-classes/?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=digital-humanities-tools-in-online-humanities-classes 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031628448704646 


Websites 

Caterina Agostini (Co-Author, collaborator, and curator); Laura Morreale (Director); Monica Keane (Curator of an exhibition); Christine Kralik (Curator of an exhibition), et al., "Image du monde Challenge Project." Collaborative transcriptions of Image du monde, a medieval treatise by Gossuin (Gautier) du Metz (24 February 2021)

URL: https://imagedumonde.wordpress.com 

DOI: https://doi.org/10.17605/OSF.IO/DG4N9 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031634849704646 

"A Sourcebook for Health from the Sixteenth Century." A sourcebook on sixteenth-century treatises on syphilis. 1 July 2019. Funded by the Open Knowledge Practicum Fellowship at the Electronic Textual Cultures Lab, University of Victoria, British Columbia (May 2019)

URL: https://sourcebookmedicalhumanitiesscience.wordpress.com 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031628448504646 

"Santorio's Medical Method." A digital presentation of the early modern physician Santorio Santorio (9 May 2018)

URL: https://scalar.usc.edu/works/science-and-vision/index 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031628448604646 


Conference Poster 

"Art in the Time of Syphilis." Digital Humanities Conference and Colloquium, 06/07/2019 - 06/08/2019, University of Victoria, British Columbia

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7282/00000087 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/permalink/01RUT_INST/1okh1ph/alma991031634849804646 


More Blog Posts 

"Renaissance Navigation." A reflection piece for La Sfera Challenge II (July 2020)

"Paleography and Digital Humanities." A reflection piece for La Sfera Challenge (May 2020)


Co-authored Blog Posts 


Caterina Agostini and Francesca Giannetti, "Introducing Constellate for Text Analysis." A blog post on digital pedagogical tools for the Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative (6 September 2020) 

URL: https://dh.rutgers.edu/constellate-for-text-analysis 

Caterina Agostini and Ben Bakelaar, "Introduction to IIIF." A blog post on digital pedagogical tools for the Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative (29 June 2021)

URL: https://dh.rutgers.edu/introduction-to-iiif 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=alma991031650849704646&context=L&vid=01RUT_INST:ResearchRepository&lang=en 


Caterina Agostini and Ben Bakelaar, "Special Interest Group on IIIF." A blog post on digital pedagogical tools for the Rutgers Digital Humanities Initiative (21 June 2021)

URL: https://dh.rutgers.edu/special-interest-group-on-iiif 

Rutgers permalink: https://scholarship.libraries.rutgers.edu/discovery/fulldisplay?docid=alma991031650849804646&context=L&vid=01RUT_INST:ResearchRepository&lang=en 

Translating Italian Texts: Luigi Pirandello's Short Stories

Photo Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Medieval Padua Painted City

Medieval Padua Painted City is my pedagogical project celebrating the 14th-century fresco cycles in Padua, Italy being included in the UNESCO World Heritage List, May 2022

I presented this project at the 2022 International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo MI, in a panel sponsored by TEAMS, Teaching Association for Medieval Studies, and Iter: Gateway to the Middle Ages & Renaissance

Here is my outreach on Twitter


Cultural Heritage... without Borders

Recently, the beauty of medieval fresco cycles has earned Padua, my hometown, to be inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage list in July 2021. 

Padua Urbs Picta: 'The Painted City'


Background image: 

Giusto de' Menabuoi, A view of Padua in the 1300s, from the Chapel of the Blessed Luca Belludi in the Basilica of Saint Anthony of Padua


I am presenting this research at the International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo, MI (May 2022, online):

“Digital Cultural Heritage: Medieval Padua Art in the UNESCO World Heritage List” for the panel “Teaching the Middle Ages Using Digital Mapping,” International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 9-14 May 2022 (online)

Invited Talk, 2022 Winter School on Digital Humanities and Computational Social Sciences, FGV CPDOC, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

“IIIF for Cultural Heritage,” Winter School on Digital Humanities and Computational Social Sciences, Fundação Getulio Vargas, Center for Research and Documentation of Contemporary Brazilian History, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 20 July 2022 (online)

Themes: IIIF, cultural heritage, digital cultural heritage, Digital Humanities, IIIF outreach, underrepresented languages

What is Digital Storytelling?

Digital storytelling is the practice of using computer-based tools to create, tell, and share stories. This is a powerful tool in the cultural heritage sector, as it can help you communicate while you engage with your audiences.

In the Europeana Storytelling Task Force (1 September 2020 - 31 March 2021), I collaborated on the following projects and strategies:


In the Europeana Communicators Community, we discussed examined three case studies of digital storytelling

The Europeana Storytelling Task Force

Who are we at Europeana? Europeana, the cultural web portal for the European Union, runs projects and task forces through the Europeana Network Association. As an active member of the Europeana Communicators Community, I contributed to developing digital storytelling best practices (2020-2021)

More Resources at Europeana

For an overview of digital storytelling at Europeana, the cultural web portal for the European Union, click here


Find more resources on:

Open access collections 

Everyday objects and images

Nature and environment

Fair use

Diversity and inclusion

Women's History

Social media style guides

Creating timelines with Timeline JS Knight Lab (Northwestern University)

Making animated GIFs

Making digital books online with Book Creator

Creating AR galleries on Spark AR Studio

Voice-over narrations with Narakeet 

Making visual stories through infographics with Piktochart 

Creating interactive images, presentations, and infographics with Genial.ly


For a list of digital storytelling tools, click here

Literature Review: Accessibility, Public Domain, and Open Access 

Here are some of the books I've read recently

Libraries

John G. Palfrey. Bibliotech: Why Libraries Matter More Than Ever in the Age of Google. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2013.

Visualization Models

Review of Dario Rodighiero, Mapping Affinities: Democratizing Data Visualization. Geneve, Switzerland:  MetisPresses, 2021, Digital Scholarship in the Humanities (2021), https://doi.org/10.1093/llc/fqab096 (8 November 2021). 

Free-access link in the Rutgers SOAR institutional repository

Stay Tuned 🎵🎤📻

This year, I have been collaborating on conference presentations and articles. Topics include:

About Caterina Agostini, Ph.D.

Caterina Agostini earned her Ph.D. from Rutgers University Department of Italian, where she specialized in early modern science and medical humanities. She holds an MA in Italian from Rutgers University, an MA in Classics and the History of Science, and a BA in Humanities and Classics from Padua University. 

As a scholar writing on Galileo and early modern science, she is a digital expert in cultural heritage at IIIF, the Transcription Challenge Framework, Europeana Pro and The International Consortium of Photo Archives. Caterina was the inaugural D’Argenio Fellow in History and Data Visualization at Seton Hall University (2021-2022). She is the forthcoming Eugene Garfield Fellow at the American Philosophical Society and Museum (2023). Caterina is a Phi Sigma Iota member advocating for Italian language, literature, and culture.

Caterina Agostini

E-mail cagostin [at] iu [dot] edu

ORCID iD https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1695-0433

Google Scholar https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=fJGAHeAAAAAJ&hl=en&oi=ao

Twitter @CateAgostini 

Humanities Commons @agostini

GitHub CateAgostini https://github.com/CateAgostini 

LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/caterina-agostini